How to Replace an RV Carbon Monoxide Detector (Step-by-Step)

Carbon monoxide is known as the silent killer – it’s colorless, odorless… and deadly!

So, when your CO detector starts malfunctioning or has reached its end of life, it’s important to replace it immediately.

In this guide, you’ll learn how to replace an RV carbon monoxide detector step-by-step. And if you have a combo RV carbon monoxide/propane detector, we’ll show you how to replace it, as well.

Let’s get started!

How to Replace an RV Carbon Monoxide Detector

We’ll start with replacing a stand-alone CO detector in an RV. If you replace a dual propane gas and carbon monoxide detector that runs on 12v power, you can skip down to those instructions in the next section.

These instructions should work for most battery-powered Safe-T-Alert RV Carbon Monoxide Detector models (which we highly recommend) and more.

Important Notes

  • The installation instructions for your carbon monoxide detector’s brand and model may be slightly different from what we outline below, so always refer to the owner’s manual of your specific detector.
  • Be sure the location of your CO detector is on the ceiling or a wall at least 4 inches off the floor. Do NOT install within 12 inches of an outside opening, 5 feet from any cooking appliance, or behind furniture or drapes. Check out our guide on where to mount a carbon monoxide detector in an RV for more information.

Step 1: Remove the Old Carbon Monoxide Detector

We first need to remove the old unit from the mounting plate on the wall. It will likely either snap or slide off.

If you’re replacing it with the same model, you can leave the mounting plate on the wall and re-use it. If not, remove the mounting plate, as well.

Step 2: Install the Replacement CO Detector

If you use the existing mounting plate, snap or slide the new alarm to the plate.

Otherwise, screw the new mounting plate to the wall, then attach the replacement detector. Ensure that the pull tab for activation is visible.

Step 3: Remove the Pull Tab

To activate the carbon monoxide detector, pull the tab to remove it.

Step 4: Test the CO Detector

Finally, we will want to test the CO alarm by pressing the Test button, which is usually right on the face of the detector. Be sure to make visual inspections of the alarm and test it weekly and when taking your RV out of storage.

Tip: On some CO detector models, the testing feature will only test the electronic components and not the sensors. If this is the case for your unit, you’ll need to test the CO sensor using a can of testing gas.

How to Replace an RV Carbon Monoxide Propane Detector

If your detector features a dual alarm that detects propane and carbon monoxide gas, the replacement procedure will be slightly different.

These instructions are for a 12v powered dual CO/LP detector. We recommend the Safe-T-Alert 35 Series RV LP/CO Alarm by MTI Industries.

Safe-T-Alert 35-742-BL Dual LP/CO Alarm

Safe-T-Alert 35-742-BL Dual LP/CO Alarm

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Important Notes

  • The installation instructions for your dual propane/carbon monoxide detector’s brand and model may be different from what we outline below. Please refer to the owner’s manual of your specific detector.
  • Be sure the location of your dual CO/propane gas detector is at least 4 inches but not more than 20 inches off the floor. Do NOT install within 12 inches of an outside opening, on an outside wall, within 5 feet from any cooking appliance, or behind furniture or drapes.

Step 1: Turn Off the Power

We will be wiring our new dual detector into the RV’s electrical system, so we will first need to cut the power to the existing detector. This is usually as simple as removing a fuse or flipping a switch.

Step 2: Remove the Old Detector

We now need to remove the old carbon monoxide/propane detector. To do this:

  1. Detach the unit from the mounting plate or wall.
  2. Cut the two wires that are leading to the detector.
  3. If applicable, unscrew the mounting plate and remove it from the wall.

Tip: If you replace an old surface mount detector with a flush mount model, you may have to cut a larger hole in the wall to allow the detector to fit.

Step 3: Strip the Detector Wires

Cut and remove about 1/4″ of shielding from the end of both wires, if needed. We will be attaching these to our new detector.

Step 4: Re-wire the New Detector

Connect the cut wires from the wall to the leads on the new detector. Ensure you have properly connected the wires (red = power, black = ground).

Step 5: Attach the Replacement Detector to the Wall

Once wired, attach the new unit to the wall. This typically consists of using the two screw holes located on the ends of the alarm casing.

Step 6: Test the New Detector

Turn the power back on and wait 10 minutes for the unit to warm up. Then test it by pressing the “Test” button found on the face of the detector. If your device passes the test, it has been properly installed.

Tip: On some dual LP/CO detector models, the testing feature will only test the electronic components and not the sensors. If this is the case for your device, you’ll need to test the CO sensor using a can of testing gas. And test the propane sensor using propane or butane gas.

When Should I Replace My RV Carbon Monoxide Detector?

You should replace your RV carbon monoxide detector when the unit has reached its end of life or has started to malfunction.

Most units will have a 5-year lifespan. When it reaches the end of its life, it will typically notify you with a series of beeps and LED flashes. For example, the Safe-T-Alert models typically flash red, red, green, green with a beep every 30 seconds. Atwood, Kiddie, and other brands of CO detectors might have a different series of beeps and flashes, which is why it’s important to refer to your detectors owner’s manual.

Tip: Know your beeps! Refer to your detectors owner’s manual and get to know what each beeping pattern signifies. This will help you quickly understand the difference between an actual carbon monoxide or propane alarm versus a malfunction or end-of-life alarm.

So, visually inspect and test your CO detector often, as with all of your RV safety devices. If your RV carbon monoxide detector keeps beeping, and your certain there’s no CO in your recreational vehicle, it may be time to replace it.

Related: RV Propane Detector Keeps Going Off? Do This!

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